Bookbind THIS Conclusion

Get organized, and save money, too.

This is the third and final part of this series. The previous two described the tools, materials, and fixtures required for the processes involved. The objective behind the process is to save valuable technical information that has been placed into your hands. Most all of the technical knowledge shared with us is in the form of a schematic diagram, which, if saved, will continue to share the knowledge forever.

Photo A. Annual volume stacked in the clamping fixture. Note the ragged stem prior to being trimmed with the rasp. 32 73 Amateur Radio Today • May 2001

Fig. 1. Saw cuts for kite string. Cuts made at approximately 3040 degrees.

The final stage of the process involves rasping the stem of the "new" volume in preparation for the stem to be glued. After being glued, the new volume is then ready for a cover that will be marked to identify the new volume. The end result will be the recovery of .shelf space while saving valuable information in an organized manner.

Prep stage

After clamping the stack tightly, the paper stem will be cut using a rasp, and if tight enough the paper will cut like soft wood (see Photo A). For binding purposes, it is desirable to create a straight/square-cut stem. The rasp is best held with both hands and drawn at a 45-degree angle downward across the stem. Rasping continues until about 1/8-inch of the stem remains exposed beyond the blocks — or until the shortest page is exposed. Upon inspection. if it appears that the lower pages have folded away from the rasp rather than be cut, the rasp cutting direction can be reversed such that the rasp is drawn upward while you take note to make sure the lower pages are being trimmed to match-ili e others.

One of the objectives of rasping the stem is to reduce the wider pages to be equal to the narrowest ones. But there is no guarantee that all of the pages will be exposed to the stem backing after the rasping appears to be complete. In an^ attempt to pick up all of the pages and to mechanically strengthen the stem region of the "new" volume, kite string is tied into the stem. Three

Photo A. Annual volume stacked in the clamping fixture. Note the ragged stem prior to being trimmed with the rasp. 32 73 Amateur Radio Today • May 2001

Photo B. Stem after being rasped, sawed, and notched.

Fig. 2. Deep file cuts/notches used to expose the narrowest pages for gluing.

Photo B. Stem after being rasped, sawed, and notched.

pairs of saw cuts arc made into the stem area as shown in Fig. 1. The specific angle of the cut is not at all critical, but it must be at a slight angle sufficient to keep the string in place until glue is applied.

A loose page found in a newly bound volume is very frustrating, so an additional precautionary step is taken in the process. The precaution step taken is shown in Fig. 2, where the sharp teeth on the edge of the rasp, and/or the rounded side of the rasp, are used to cut some deep "V" or liU" shape cuts in the stem. The cuts are as deep as the clamping Fixture will allow (about I/8-inch), and are made sufficiently wide to allow glue to reach deeply into the stem area and hopefully capture ALL of the pages (see Photo B).

Once all of the rasping and cutting has been completed, the stem should be vacuumed well to remove as much paper dust as possible. I've found that a shop-vac with a narrow pickup nozzle works best.

When everything is clear of dust, kite siring is placed into the saw cuts (see Photo C). I've found that looping the string twice around and through the cuts is sufficient. The string is looped through each pair of angular cuts and pulled fairly snug. In most cases, three sets of string cuts are ample to maintain the strength of the stem for normal usage.

The ends of the string are lied only tight enough to keep the string from falling out of the saw cuts. Once applied, the glue will hold ihe string in place. The ends of the string beyond the knot may be left fairly long to be glued against the back of the stem, providing extra strength.

The last step before removing the volume from the clamps is to apply glue to the stem area (see Photo D). I've found that an acid brush works well because it has a stiff hair bristle. Glue is worked into the saw culs in an attempt to coat the string that is buried in the cut. Glue is then spread along the stem and into the "V" or "U" cuts ■and scrubbed into the paper. How much glue should be applied? The amount isn't loo critical at this stage, but it should touch eaclTpage and not be so heavy that it runs off onto the fixture. The book volume is a little dil-ficull to remove from Lhc clamping block if the glue has gotten between the paper and the block. A sharp knife or razor blade may be used lo cut the glue, "should it be necessary. Just lift

Continued on page 34

Continued on page 34

Photo C. Kite string tied through sawed slots. Loose string ends left to be glued against the stem.

Photo D. Glued stem.

Photo C. Kite string tied through sawed slots. Loose string ends left to be glued against the stem.

Photo D. Glued stem.

Photo E. Completed/glued stem. Volume is ready for the cover.

Bookbind THIS! — Conclusion continued from page 33

the book, exposing the glue strip, and cut il with a blade.

More glue will be added later on so that only enough need be applied at this stage to maintain the integrity of the stack/volume. Photo E shows the bound and glued volume now ready for a cover.

Preparing the cover

A manila folder is the easiest material to use as a cover. Most manila folders have been pre -creased several times adjacent to the fold so that they can be sized to 111 the needs of the user.

Unfortunately, for bookbinding applications, the creases are in the wrong position. For cosmetic reasons, the multiple-creased side is used as the back of the new cover. The exception is when accommodating a thick volume — some of the creases will end up appearing along the stem area.

During the cover preparation stage, the cover must be placed on a flat hard surface such as a tabletop. The selected front side of the cover faces upward and is then lifted to stand vertical with respect to the back. Now in an open position, the new volume is placed on the cover back while you press the stem against the vertical cover. Using a pencil, a short line is drawn on the inside of the front cover at the height of the volume (see Photo F). The volume is then removed and placed aside momentarily.

With ihe cover opened up flat, use a thumbnail or other tool to crcate a short crease along the pencil line at the edge of the cover. The short crease will be used to start a new fold in the cover to accommodate the height of the volume. Place a thumbnail at the edge of the cover, on the short crease, and begin folding the cover down against the thumb and table (see Photo G). When a distinct crease has been started, the top and bottom cover edges are aligned to one another and held tightly with hand pressure.

At this point, a new crease/fold can be started at the folder's edge by holding pressure against the two cover sides so that they won't slip or twist. A

thumb is then run along from the start of the fold from the bottom to the top (see Photo H). If the front and rear covers remained in place during the folding, a nice straight crease should have been created.

Open up the cover, slip the "new" volume into it, and check for fit. The cover should fit well along the stem and will overhang the pages. After gluing. the cover will be trimmed to fit the volume.

Gluing the cover

Before gluing the cover, arrangements must be made for clamping the cover to the volume. Several techniques may be utilized for this purpose. I've found that standing the volume on its stem works well. Small "C'-clamps are used to hold the ends of the cover to the volume. Heavy weights are also pressed against the sides of the volume (see Photo I) both to hold the cover tightly against the volume and to support the volume in a vertical position while the glue dries.

Several volumes ma.jc,be clamped simultaneously if the clamps are large enough, or enough weights are available.

Padding compound dries rather quickly, but it should be allowed to cure for five or more hours-before the volumg.is opened. White glue dries more slowly and should be allowed to set for 24 hours or more.

An ample amount of glue is applied to the stem of the new volume with

Photo F. Pencil is used to mark the volume height inside of the cover. 34 73 Amateur Radio Today • May 2001

Photo H. Cover folded over at the crease across the cover.

crease being extended

Photo I. Freshly glued volumes standing on their stem while the glue dries. ClampsAveights are used to hold the volumes in a vertical position.

Photo H. Cover folded over at the crease across the cover.

crease being extended

Photo I. Freshly glued volumes standing on their stem while the glue dries. ClampsAveights are used to hold the volumes in a vertical position.

care to fill all of the spots possibly missed during the binding process. A thin line of glue, about 1/8-inch wide, is run down both the front and rear edges of the volume adjacent to tire stem. Glue in this area w ill tie down the string loops and provide additional support for the new cover near the stem.

Immediately after the glue is applied, the volume is carefully fitted into the new cover. It is important to NOT get any glue onto the cover in areas where it shouldn't be. If glue does gel on areas where it doesn't belong, a water-dampened cloth can be used to remove the extraneous glue. Slipping a small piece of waxed paper between the cover and volume will prevent the residual glue spot from binding them together.

With the glued volume and cover in place, the volume should be "seated" to the cover by holding it between the hands and then allowing ii to drop an inch or two onto the stem. The volume must be supported during the drop to prevent il from falling over during the impact. Once seated, the volume can be placed between weights to hold it in a vertical position. Photo J shows how the excess cover material is removed. Scissors are held against the volume using the volume as a cutting guide.

Marking the cover

Marking on the covcr is done with a fine-tip Sharpie™ pen or equivalent. Marking is done on the cover, stem, and bottom of the volume (see Photo K).

On the cover, the first row of title characters should be at a position approximately three fifths of the way up from the bottom of the volume, placing it at a desirable viewing perspective. A second row. if used, is placed below the firsl lo suit the user's perspective.

The volume year is centered and placed about an inch or so below the title characters. When there are missing issues to the volume. I've found that adding a note below the date indicating either those issues contained or those missing helps later on during a reference search.

Marking the stem and bottom should also be dotie as well. Title marking should begin near the top of the stem and extend down as far as necessary. The volume date is placed a short distance up from the bottoirfof the stem.

To facilitate identifying the volume when il is in a stack of other volumes, marking the bottom edge is very desirable. An abbreviated title and date is usually all that's required.

Opening the new volume

Care must be taken when opening

Confirmed on page 58

Confirmed on page 58

Photo J. Glued cover being trimmed flush with the volume edge.

Photo K. Marking/identification placed on the cover, stem, and bottom of the volume.

Photo J. Glued cover being trimmed flush with the volume edge.

Photo K. Marking/identification placed on the cover, stem, and bottom of the volume.

Homing in

Radio Direction Finding Joe Moe"PE K0OV

Fullerlon CA 92837 [[email protected]] [http://www.homingin.com]

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